Storage unit saga continues

There is an ad on the subway that says, I don't need to live in a doorman apartment because I have enough people in my life judging me. It is an ad for people searching for apartments.

The manager at the storage unit called and said there was not a lot of water damage and he removed the 5 or so of wet boxes, put the contents into new boxes and moved me to another unit. I asked him if my stuff in those wet boxes was damaged. He said the trash bags in the boxes saved my things and he said I had a lot of shoes. The lot of shoes comment reminded me of the subway ad. Was he judging me for my shoes?

I personally don't think I have a lot of shoes. I have shoes for specific activities. I have running shoes, bike shoes for road and mountain, snow shoes, boots for mountaineering, shoes I typically wore to the archery range, rubber rain boots, casual boots, sandals, flip flops, hiking boots, and maybe one pair of flats. Does that sound excessive?

I filed the reimbursement claim and they will decide how much of the $2,000 to pay based on my list of items and pictures.

Hobbit holes in SF

Every once in a while I consider my living situation and think I am spending a lot of money on rent and I don’t spend a lot of time at home. I consider, are there better apartments with less rent? Maybe I should spend more money on a one bedroom? 

In the last few weeks, I have seen apartments that I can’t believe are apartments. The 1 bedroom that was in a garage that should have been classified as a garage storage space or a hobbit hole, instead was renting for $1850. I have seen ads for apartments that look nice except they don’t have a kitchen. I do not want to live in a studio, learning my lesson from that loft apartment in Philly with no doors. Even living by myself, I like doors. The ad exchange for domestic services for rent was tempting but in reality it was someone who wanted “a friend.”  I visited an apartment with a nice size bedroom and closet but the rest of the house was very old, the roommates didn’t seem like people I wanted to live with and there was no extra storage or washer/dryer. Upon seeing the last apartment, I realized my situation is great in comparison.

I have my wish of not putting my bike in the house. I love my bike but I neither want it in a bedroom or living room. I need a washer and dryer. I have a gear closet. I have extra closets. I have a dining room table that fits 6 comfortably. I am grateful for a space for an office to study from with a daybed for overnight guests. I have a decent size kitchen and pantry. I live in a house that can entertain 15 people. I love my neighborhood. 

There are a few things I don’t like about the house but they are not deal breakers.  It wouls be nice to have my own private bathroom or walls-floors-doors that had better soundproofing but all in all it is not a bad house.  The downside is I live with other people and share the bathroom. It gets old sometimes, tolerating other people’s habits, having my kitchen ware and linens ruined, always the one to clean and take out the trash. I don’t cook often or ever but I want nice knives, matching bowls and pots that aren’t burnt by others.  It’s a trade-off, sharing, but I have a washer and dryer which makes up for a lot.  Keeping my bike and gear in the garage helps me be patient.  Searching for a rental property in San Francisco is a full time effort that is filled with disappointment. It is like a finding a pot of gold in March.

First world problems – shoes

How many shoes does one person need? In many developing countries, people only have one pair or shoes, or some don’t have any shoes. My last few Task Rabbit projects have been helping people downsize their stuff. I am very objective in my own way, I often say, you don’t need this. They argue back, and say, they do. Then, I ask when was the last time they used it and what purpose does it serve? Out of sight, is generally out of mind. If you can’t see the items, you’re likely not going to use them. My words of persuasion are getting better with practice.

It’s an interesting phenomenon, our attachment to stuff. I don’t think I have much of an attachment to stuff, but then I think about the shoes. The girl I was working with yesterday, I let her keep the cowboy boots even though she doesn’t wear them much, but I made her get rid of a several pairs of flats in exchange. She had shiny silver sparkly shoes and I wondered when does she wear those. It’s been a long time since I’ve worn shiny sparkly shoes.

I went home and examined my own closet and each pair of shoes does serve a function. You have your basic every day shoes, a few pairs of flip flops, my running shoes, hiking boots, biking cleats, (tri and road), water sport shoes, snow boots, down boots, rain boots, dress work shoes, and 2 open toed sandals. I think that sums it up. It is over a dozen and makes me feel a little overwhelmed when I think of it. The worst part is I do want more. I want a tall pair of boots, even though I no longer live in a place that has a true winter, maybe I can wear it here in the fall.